Body Mass Index (BMI) is one method to calculate your body fat composition based off of a height/weight formulas.

Created in Belgium sometime between 1830 & 1850 and after 184 years it is inaccurate, outdated and needs to be replaced.

Those who attended higher education in Europe in the 19.

Those who attended higher education in Europe in the 19th century tended to be mostly Caucasian, males, about 5’6, and weighing an average of  135lbs.  These averages no longer apply today and contribute to incorrect

These averages no longer apply today and contribute to incorrect formulas.

Obesity is a serious concern and that needs be addressed. However, using such inaccurate methods may have some dire consequences.

It “misdiagnosis” over a third of those tested. You could be one who tests as obese, that is not or, you think you are in the normal range and you are not. Either

However, using such inaccurate methods may have some dire consequences. It “misdiagnosis” over a third of those tested. You could be one who tests as obese, that is not or, you think you are in the normal range and you are not. Either

It “misdiagnosis” over a third of those tested. You could be one who tests as obese, that is not or, you think you are in the normal range and you are not. Either way, there could be a price to pay. You could be charged more for your health care someday or you could be oblivious to the health risks not knowing that you are actually overweight.

BMI is Not a Reliable Method for Diagnosing Overweight or Obesity

Below is an excerpt from Dr. Mercola’s article Why BMI is Not a Great Indicator of Body Composition.

“If you’d like to know how much body fat you have, and whether or not your levels put you into a weight category that might lead to health problems, most public health agencies, and therefore most physicians, promote the use of the Body Mass Index (BMI).

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) call it a “reliable indicator of body fatness” for most people, but new research confirms that the method, which gauges weight in relation to height, is actually seriously flawed. According to CDC estimates, which are based on BMIs, the United States has an obesity rate of 20 percent, with certain states approaching 30 percent. Researchers from New York University compared a DXA (duel-energy x-ray absorptiometry) scan, which is a FAR more accurate method to assess body fat percentage, to BMI and found the CDC estimates likely seriously underestimate the rate of obesity in the U.S.